Antonioni’s ‘La Notte’: The death of a marriage has never looked better

Now playing in L.A. in a digital restoration: Seen today, Antonioni's stylish drama about a marriage on the verge of collapse is a welcome reminder that a filmmaker doesn't need a shaky digital camera to convey intimacy or emotional honesty. Read more [...]

‘The Night Porter’: The dumbest movie about the Holocaust ever made?

Out now on Blu-Ray and streaming: 1974's The Night Porter is the story of the twisted sadomasochistic bond between a Nazi officer and the concentration-camp inmate he forces to become his mistress. This is a movie that turns the Holocaust into chic schlock. It had lapsed into well-deserved obscurity in recent decades; was there really anyone clamoring for it to come out on Blu-Ray? Read more [...]

The mean girls of Rome: ‘Caterina in the Big City’

Fans of The Great Beauty, this year's winner for Best Foreign-Language Film, should seek out this little-known comic gem from 2003. Like Paolo Sorrentino's Oscar winner, it's a witty portrait of modern-day Italy — seen here through the eyes of an eighth-grade girl. Read more [...]

Pasolini’s ‘The Hawks and the Sparrows’: A comic Marxist fable — how often do you get to see one of those?

Pasolini’s engaging fable The Hawks and the Sparrows (1966) is the work of a filmmaker who’s still able to make his points with humor. It's a far better way to remember Pasolini than Salo. Read more [...]

A month of Pier Paolo Pasolini — filmmaker, author, Renaissance man — at the UCLA Film Archive

Italy's Pier Paolo Pasolini was a renowned filmmaker, novelist, poet and political gadfly. He was also Catholic, Marxist and gay, not to mention a born iconoclast. He had no shortage of artistic material, in other words. This month the UCLA Film Archive offers a great opportunity to (re)discover Pasolini with 12 of his films, in new 35mm prints. Read more [...]